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cep Authors: Tony Shan, Liz McMillan, Bob Gourley, Charles Rich, AppDynamics Blog

Related Topics: SOA & WOA Magazine, CEP on Ulitzer

SOA & WOA: Article

Turning Service-Oriented Events into Business Insight

Event-Stream Processing - tools for an event-driven service oriented architecture

The "WITHIN" statement illustrates another key concept in ESP: namely time. In this example, if the third credit_payment event isn't detected within two minutes of the first charge, the activity isn't flagged as potentially fraudulent, and the scenario completes. In stream computing, as in the "real-time, agile enterprise," the significance of any individual event - in terms of business importance - quickly depreciates. The window of opportunity to act on an event is often brief and transient. Unless the event processing architecture can rapidly discern the significance and respond, the opportunity to exploit the situation will quickly pass, with the circumstances altered by subsequent events or other factors.

Finally, we see the third key element of ESP: action. Automated systems like a credit fraud detection application often invoke event-driven actions once a pattern has been detected. In this example, the current request for a charge is declined and the account is flagged for fraud management by sending a new derived event on the ESB.

Conclusion
As the Enterprise Service Bus becomes the backbone of the enterprise IT integration infrastructure, it provides a stream of events that can make real-time insight a reality. Stream computing and the ESP tools that enable it provide the ability to detect time, cause, and spatial-based patterns among events in the ESB stream. By combining ESP rules with an ESB-normalized integration fabric, the enterprise can become truly agile.

References

  • Event Programming:
    Mark Palmer and Gareth Smith.
    "An Event Processing Language Tutorial." Progress Software.
  • General ESP Product and Academic Information:
    A is a web portal of ESP term definitions, links to ESP products, academic papers, and community discussions.
    www.eventstreamprocessing.com
  • ESP Architecture and Technology:
    John Bates.
    "Apama Technical Overview." Progress Software. Available on request.
    Mark Palmer.
    "Event Stream Processing, a New Physics of Computing." DMReview. July, 2005.
    www.dmreview.com
  • Glossary of Terms:
    A glossary of industry terms, including BAM, CEP, EDA, Event, and Event Streams can be found at www.eventstreamprocessing.com/glossary
  • Community and Discussion Group:
    The CEP-interest group, co-moderated by Mark Palmer and David Luckham, has been joined by enterprise architects, members of academia, software vendors, and industry analysts interested in ESP and CEP.
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/CEP-Interest.
  • Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) and ESP:
    Mark Palmer.
    "The 7 Principles of RFID Data Management."
    www.esj.com/enterprise/article.aspx?EditorialsID=1076
  • Algorithmic Trading and ESP:
    Dr. John Bates. "The Apama Technical Overview." 2005.
  • Complex Event Processing:
    David Luckham. "The Power of Events, An Introduction to Complex Event Processing in Distributed Enterprise Systems." Indianapolis. 2002. A comprehensive list of academic papers and resources can be found at www.eventstreamprocessing.com/webindex.htm.
  • Academic Resources on complex event processing, data stream processing:
    The event-stream processing resource site is at www.eventstreamprocessing.com
    See the index.

More Stories By Mark Palmer

Mark has over 14 years of experience in technology, most recently as
CTO of YouthStream Media Networks where he led all technology
initiatives, from internal operations to the creation of the Sodalis
platform for integrating and supporting several hundred of
YouthStream's partners, including leading colleges and universities
in the United States.

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Most Recent Comments
SYS-CON Belgium News Desk 08/15/06 05:25:40 PM EDT

The quest for agility has spurred the recent rise of Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) and the face of modern IT integration architecture is changing. Technology stovepipes of the past are now being connected by Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) technology, which provides the backbone for the networking, communication, mediation, and service container management needed to support an SOA. Every integration software vendor provides some form of ESB in its products and the ESB has risen to the status of a de facto standard for SOA integrating. But what's the next step in the evolution of the IT integration fabric?

SOA Web Services Journal News 08/15/06 03:52:42 PM EDT

The quest for agility has spurred the recent rise of Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) and the face of modern IT integration architecture is changing. Technology stovepipes of the past are now being connected by Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) technology, which provides the backbone for the networking, communication, mediation, and service container management needed to support an SOA. Every integration software vendor provides some form of ESB in its products and the ESB has risen to the status of a de facto standard for SOA integrating. But what's the next step in the evolution of the IT integration fabric?

SYS-CON Australia News Desk 08/01/06 03:36:04 PM EDT

The quest for agility has spurred the recent rise of Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) and the face of modern IT integration architecture is changing. Technology stovepipes of the past are now being connected by Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) technology, which provides the backbone for the networking, communication, mediation, and service container management needed to support an SOA. Every integration software vendor provides some form of ESB in its products and the ESB has risen to the status of a de facto standard for SOA integrating. But what's the next step in the evolution of the IT integration fabric?

SOA Web Services Journal News 07/31/06 08:38:52 AM EDT

The quest for agility has spurred the recent rise of Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) and the face of modern IT integration architecture is changing. Technology stovepipes of the past are now being connected by Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) technology, which provides the backbone for the networking, communication, mediation, and service container management needed to support an SOA. Every integration software vendor provides some form of ESB in its products and the ESB has risen to the status of a de facto standard for SOA integrating. But what's the next step in the evolution of the IT integration fabric?